Showing posts with label Steve Hunter. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Steve Hunter. Show all posts

10.04.2017

THE DEACON OF ROCK BITES BACK!! STEVE HUNTER'S NEW CD!


Our dear friends Steve and Karen Ann Hunter have released a new album 
Guitar legend Steve Hunter's “Before The Lights Go Out”. We have our copy and just keep playing it over and over. Steve's unique guitar style is such gorgeous music. Thank you Steve and Karen!! xoK

Here is the official press release from Glass Onyon below:


The Deacon Of Rock Bites Back!

“Before The Lights Go Out” is long time Alice Cooper/Lou Reed Guitarist Steve Hunter’s latest solo album. The cover art and title make a statement about his failing eyesight, but don’t make the mistake of thinking this is a quiet wave goodbye. As soon as you put on the first track, you will know that this is more like a Blues Rock Declaration of Independence! There are sexy grooves, luscious guitar tones and melodies galore.

As with all Hunter’s releases, there is some diversity and sound imagery, not least of which is Tienes Mi Corazón where alongside his nylon string improvisation comes the sound of his own heart. And listen out for Joe Satriani adding his fire to the heat of “Mojo Man.”

Also joining Steve on a couple of tracks are two great Bass players: Erik Scott can be heard on “Mojo Man,” Erik is also an Alice Cooper alumni. On “Under The Bodhi Tree” is Andy Stoller. Steve and Andy toured together with Tracy Chapman during the “Telling Stories” album period, most recently Andy has been touring with Ann Wilson of Heart.


Says Steve, “This album was a real joy for me on many levels. A big part of the inspiration and motivation that kept me going; was from all the people out there who had faith in me and encouraged me through the entire process with their donations and comments. It was really a wonderful experience having you all be a part of it. It’s my deepest hope and desire that you all enjoy the music on this album as much as I enjoyed making it. Thank you and God bless!”

Watch the album sampler video: 



Steve Hunter is his own man; he has been around the block with a forty-five year career.

From his 1973 solos on Alice Cooper’s “Billion Dollar Babies” album, his legendary acoustic work on Peter Gabriel’s “Solsbury Hill,” his “Intro” to Lou Reed’s “Sweet Jane” and his searing opening solos on Aerosmith’s version of “Train Kept A Rolling” Most recently he can be heard on Alice Cooper’s 2017 album “Paranormal” making this his ninth Cooper album appearance. The Deacon is not done yet but his life is evolving! He has challenges playing live now but his honed skill, tone, power and soul, is dished up on this hot plate of guitar driven instrumental tastiness.

Order your copy today!

Click link above or icon below 


Tracks:
1. On The Edge Of Uncertainty
2. Mojo Man
3. Summer’s Eve
4. Cinderblock
5. Softtail Deuce
6. Tienes Mi Corazón (You Have My Heart)
7. Ice Storm
8. Under The Bodhi Tree
9. The Other Side Of The Coin
10. Happy Trails (vocal Karen Hunter)

For more information:
http://www.stevehunter.com/
https://www.facebook.com/steve.hunter.54

5.19.2017

TOM GUERRA: TRAMPLING OUT THE VINTAGE


Detroit Music has influenced millions including East coast lead guitarist Tom Guerra (Mambo Sons). Chatted online with Tom last night and he released a new LP a few months back "Trampling Out the Vintage"...Click the links to listen to each track. We loved it! 


Popa Chubby with Tom Guerra

Creem Magazine was the bible that I grew up on, and some of my all time favorite guitarists are Jim McCarty and Steve Hunter (who both did time in Mitch Ryder's bands!). From a songwriting perspective, the great Lamont Dozier and brothers Brian and Eddie Holland who wrote many of Motown's greatest hits were huge influences. Tom Guerra




ABOUT THE ALBUM: “Trampling Out the Vintage” is the second solo album from Mambo Sons’ guitarist Tom Guerra. The title is from a line in “Battle Hymn of the Republic” aka “Glory Glory Hallelujah”), and refers to the old guitars and amps used in the recording process. Like “All of the Above” (Tom’s first solo disc), “Trampling…” is an old school rock and roll record, but one written for these times. Joining Tom in the studio this time was…

Kenny Aaronson and Tom Guerra

"Most recently, Tom has been busy writing new original music with world class bassist Kenny Aaronson (currently touring with The Yardbirds) for a future recording project. "

• Kenny Aaronson – Bass guitar
• Morgan Fisher and Matt Zeiner – Piano and Hammond
• Mike “Double Dog” Kosacek – Drums and percussion

Here’s a blurb about each track in Tom’s own words…

All Purpose Song – In the old days, we’d have to tune our radios to pull in a song, and then “static evolved into grace.” This is a sort of riff rocker about how music can mean so many different things to people.

Dr. Nick and Elvis – I had a dream that Elvis and his good friend Dr. Nick ran a church to help cure the type of ills detailed in the verses. While writing it, I heard Lemmy had passed, so I included a line in about “The Ace of Spades.”

Purchase Click the Icon Below


Tell the World – The conflict between being feeling guilty to be happy when the world is going to hell in a handbasket, set in a 2 minute 43 second pop song.



BYOB – I’ve read that the NYC rock scene had some great parties in the ‘70s, and this is how I imagined them to be...

Make Your Own Kind of Music – As a kid, I fell in love with Mama Cass’ version after seeing her sing this Mann/Weil pop ditty on the Sammy Davis Jr. show. It is re-imagined here as a rock and roll tune.

Love Will Forget You – The flip side of love, in a funk styled tune. Kenny’s bass sort of propels this song along.


Pay In Blood – My favorite guitarists have all covered Bob Dylan, so here’s my contribution to that list, re-arranged with a more “Stonesy” vibe in open G tuning.

Supermoon – I was thinking of David Bowie and his space themed songs when I wrote this, about a rare celestial happening (also called a blood moon) that according to legend is a sign of the End of Days. Side Note: The ’63 Strat I played on this was formerly owned by Howlin’ Wolf, and is now on loan to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame until 2018.

Grow On Your Own – I wrote this about a friend of mine who was afraid to be alone.

Hard to Love – A simple ballad I wrote on piano about a not-so-nice guy that leaves his bride at the altar and ultimately realizes he’s the problem.

TG with vintage Gibson Firebird

More About Tom:

Since the late 1970s, Guerra has been on the New England club circuit, playing blues, rock and roll and R&B acts. Influenced by Rory Gallagher, Paul Kossoff, Jimmy Page, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood, Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy, and Joe Walsh, Guerra first gained notoriety after being featured in Guitar Player (March 1991).

Over the years, Guerra has recorded or played with Rick Derringer, The Dirty Bones Blues Band', Max Weinberg, Mark Nomad, Sticky Fingers (for which he wrote and arranged original music for the group's debut CD), The Easton Brothers with Muddy Waters bassist Charles Calmese, Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson from The Allman Brothers Band, Second Son, Guitar Shorty, Adolph Jacobs of The Coasters, Kenny Aaronson, and The Delrays.

Since 1998, he has written for Vintage Guitar, and has endorsed Brian Moore Custom guitars, Colby and DST-Engineering amplifiers and a variety of guitar related effects.

Tom and Scott Lawson

In 1999, he formed Mambo Sons with singer Scott Lawson, based upon a songwriting partnership that dated back to the early 1980s. Their debut album, released in 1999, featured Rick Derringer. This twelve-song effort contained both new music as well as songs the two had originally written a decade before. Read Full Bio on WIKI

9.11.2015

STEVE HUNTER GETS PAID: AEROSMITH/ALICE COOPER ROYALTIES TRIUMPH!

Steve Hunter

After 42 years, Guitar Player Steve Hunter is finally going to start receiving airtime performance royalties for guitar solos he played that helped make rock history!

This has come after the collection of sufficient evidence for his name to be officially connected with seven tracks that he did not get credit for when the albums were released.

At the top of the list is ‘Train Kept A Rollin’ from ‘Get Your Wings’ which was released in 1974 and although it has been common knowledge amongst many rock fans that Hunter did the opening half solos, that did not equate to any performance royalties until now.

The other six tracks are from the original Alice Cooper Groups album ‘Billion Dollar Babies’. Once again these albums were released without Hunter receiving credit for his solos on Hello Hooray, Raped and Freezin, Billion Dollar Babies, Unfinished Sweet, Generation Landslide and Sick Things.


Back in the 60’s and 70’s it was common to have musicians perform on records without getting credit, when record labels wanted to keep the fans focused on the main band or artist. There are numerous examples of this including the late Dick Wagner who also played guitar un credited on ‘Get Your Wings’ and of course the practice was well documented on ‘The Wrecking Crew’ film.

In those days things were often more informal or kept quiet, but as the digital age has grown, the documentation of who did what has become more pertinent.

These ‘ghosting’ players got paid a nominal session fee at the time, but unless their work was officially part of the album credits there could be no acknowledgement of their contributions with airplay performance collection agencies around the world. Unfortunately, the US does not pay airtime performance royalties to non featured players.


Often such contributions went unnoticed, a rhythm track here or there, but occasionally a contribution was made to a recording that in small part helped advance the career of the main artist as it went global with radio play. Peter Gabriel recently credited Hunter for coming up with the guitar parts on ‘Solsbury Hill’ in a new Daryl Easlea biography. This recording is also now paying Hunter airtime performance royalties.

‘Train kept A Rollin’ certainly helped Aerosmith move forward after it became a rock radio mainstay. It also became a part of Aerosmith’s ‘Guitar Hero’ ‘Legends Of Rock‘ video game, which sadly this performance royalty triumph does not cover.

However, any performance royalties are welcome at a time when Hunter needs it most as he is going blind with Pigmentary Glaucoma and touring is impossible without assistance.

There are many unsung heroes in rock music so it’s great to report that some justice has been done for Steve Hunter and this should give others hope.



There are many unsung heroes in rock music so it’s great to report that some justice has been done for Steve Hunter and this should give others hope.

2.06.2015

WHO REALLY PLAYED GUITAR SOLOS ON TRAIN KEPT A ROLLIN


STEVE 'The Deacon' HUNTER

‘Train Kept A Rollin’, was written by Tiny Bradshaw in 1951. The song was given new life by The Yardbirds in 1965 then again by the inimitable Aerosmith when they recorded it for their second album ‘Get Your Wings” in 1974.

Their version is actually a two-part song, the first has a slower groove arrangement, while the second uses that of the Yardbirds. Aerosmith turned it into a hard rock standard and a staple of classic rock radio; it remains one of their most popular tunes.

But few people know that they had a little help along the way when, during the recording, Record Producer Jack Douglas saw the now legendary session man Steve Hunter sitting outside the studio taking a cigarette break from a different session and he asked Steve to play a solo over the first half of the track.

It was very quick Steve recalls, he got his own guitar which he thinks would have been a 1959 Les Paul TV Special. They took some time to get a sound, then, ran through the track. But, as he did not have the vocal in his headphones they ran through it again this time with the vocal in, and Steve nailed it.

He got paid about $750 for doing it, then, as it turns out, 'Train' had a huge impact on the career of the young, inexperienced Aerosmith. They went on to bigger and better things, becoming one of the highest paid, most domineering bands in Rock Music.

Unbeknownst to Steve, Douglas also enlisted his session companion Dick Wagner to play the solo over the second half simulated live ‘Yardbirds’ section.

Neither Hunter or Wagner got a credit on the album, as ‘ghosting’ as it’s sometimes called was fairly common practice at that time.

Hunter has no idea why he was asked to record the solo; as he says, it was none of his business. The rest of the band we’re all there, they were very nice to him and he was never asked to teach anybody what he played.

In 2013 Joe Perry played a solo on Steve's solo album 'The Manhattan Blues Project' (The Brooklyn Shuffle) alongside his buddy Johnny Depp, so clearly there are no hard feelings and why should there be.

Statement from Steve Hunter

"Aerosmith was in Studio C of The Record Plant and I was doing work with Bob Ezrin in Studio A. I had a long wait between dubs and was waiting in the lobby. Jack Douglas popped his head out of Studio C and asked "Hey, do you feel like playing? I said sure, so I grabbed my guitar and went in" "I had two run thru’s, then Jack said "great' that's it! That turned out to be the opening solos on 'Train Kept A Rollin’ " steve hunter 2/1/2015

Here is a selection of other classic solos from Steve Hunterer




8.19.2014

STEVE HUNTER'S NEW TONE POEMS DVD/CD!

 

World-Renowned Guitar Player Steve Hunter Releases Live CD & DVD 'Tone Poems Live'

“Steve is a wonderful musician with great chops and a big heart.” - Peter Gabriel

Los Angeles, CA - For the first time ever, Blues Rock Guitarist Steve Hunter, renowned for his work with Peter Gabriel, Lou Reed and Alice Cooper, is captured on film playing a career-spanning anthology in an intimate setting with some of the worlds finest players.

Also featuring Tony Levin, Phil Aaberg and Alvino Bennett!

The DVD, titled 'Tone Poems Live', was filmed on August 24th 2013 at a recording studio in LA. Alongside Steve was Tony Levin on Bass (Peter Gabriel, King Crimson) Phil Aaberg on Keyboards (Elvin Bishop, Peter Gabriel) Alvino Bennett on Drums (Dave Mason, Robin Trower).


They rehearsed for two days and filmed on the third day as though it were in front of an audience. Fourteen tunes, each played twice, with no overdubs added later. The material was chosen from most of Steve’s solo albums plus a few covers, including ‘Solsbury Hill’ ‘What’s Going On’ and Stevie Ray Vaughan’s ‘Riviera Paradise’.

“The soulful notes that Steve Hunter plays have the perfect balance of fat warm tone, taste and personality” - Steve Vai

This is the first time Steve Hunter has ever been filmed doing his own material plus material of his own choice. Steve is now legally blind and all though not out of the question, touring has become more of a challenge. The recording session was produced and recorded by Brian Brinkerhoff and Paul Lani.


Tony Levin: “Steve is one of those wonderful musicians who speaks from the heart”

Phil Aaberg: “There’s something about the subtlety, the texture and the tone quality that he gets with an individual note, to me that’s a great guitar player”

Alvino Bennett: “I’m hearing all three Kings; Albert, BB and Freddy”

Jason Becker: “I can't put into words how much your soul comes out of your fingers. Everyone should see and hear this DVD”!

Watch some of the DVD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvG1x5og8eg

To purchase Steve Hunter's 'Tone Poems Live' DVD: http://www.stevehunter.com/Store.html

To purchase Steve Hunter's 'Tone Poems Live' CD: http://www.stevehunter.com/Store.html

Steve Hunter’s website: www.stevehunter.com


7.30.2014

DICK WAGNER HAS DIED: A TRIBUTE BY STEVE HUNTER

  Dick Wagner Photo credit BlueFat.Com

Sad news today...my old compadre Dick Wagner passed away this morning after a hard fought battle with a very bad lung infection. I know there are lots of you out there who know about the two of us and our history together. From 1973 until about 1978 Dick and I were lucky enough to play on some pretty cool records and some amazing stages all over the world with some incredible artists.

We had a thing when we played together like none other I’ve experienced. It might be because, for the most part, I think we were opposites. But I think that’s what helped us play so well together. We hardly ever had to work anything out...we just did it and it was always right. It was truly a phenomenon.

There was always mutual respect. After 1978 we went our separate ways but always stayed in loose touch. And we tried many times through the years to put something together as the Hunter/Wagner team again, but it just never seemed to work. We were at our best as a team I think, when we were focusing on the material of artists like Lou Reed and Alice Cooper.

That always seemed to be when the magic happened. Dick has written and co written some real Rock N Roll classics that will live on, as well as his playing. The stuff we did together back in the 70s was really and truly magical. With much love and respect, Rest In Peace my dear old Compadre...steve

4.01.2014

STEVE HUNTER'S OSCAR TELLER ACOUSTIC GUITAR TO BE AUCTIONED!

Steve Hunter March 2014 photo Karen Hunter

**UPDATE** 

Great news! Steve Hunter's Oscar Teller Acoustic guitar is now going be auctioned by Julien’s in their Icons & Idols Rock n Roll sale later this year.
Julien's are one of the worlds largest celebrity auctioneers and you can find out more about them here…. http://www.juliensauctions.com


Oscar Teller photo Karen Hunter

This 1964 Oscar Teller nylon string acoustic guitar has quite a history. While recording Peter Gabriel’s first solo album, we rented this guitar to use during the sessions. I loved it and would noodle on it when I wasn’t working. Robert Fripp played this incredible fast-picking part, as only Fripp could do, on this guitar in the song “Humdrum”.

There was a party after the album was finished and this guitar was given to me by Bob Ezrin and Peter. I still have the little card in the glove box. I later used this guitar on the Alice Cooper hits ‘I Never Cry’ and ‘You and Me’ plus Japanese Artist Nobuteru Maeda’s ‘Hard Pressed’. I used it on my solo album The Deacon and countless other recordings.

Oscar Teller photo Karen Hunter

The guitar is getting quite fragile now. It’s 50 years old and has done a lot of work....scratched and dinged, but it’s a beautiful sounding guitar. I think it’s time it made it to a collector...to not be played any more.

Oscar Teller photo Karen Hunter

It’s too fragile and it should be kept for its history. This guitar is for very serious collectors only and I hope someone who really loves guitars with a real history will give this guitar a great home of honor. Thanks to you all and Blessings...steve

Oscar Teller photo Karen Hunter

Interested in owning this amazing Guitar? 

Oscar Teller photo Karen Hunter

3.10.2014

BEHIND THE SCENES: STEVE HUNTER AUDITIONS FOR MITCH RYDER'S DETROIT

Mitch Ryder - Vocals Johnny Bee Badanjek - Drums, Vocals Steve Hunter -
Guitar W.R. Cooke - Bass, Vocals Mark Manko - Guitar Harry Phillips - Keyboards
John Sauter - Bass Brett Tuggle - Guitar Dirty Ed - Congas & Tambourine
3rd from the right is Boot Hamilton(Boot Hill)

Back in the day...Steve Hunter had just gotten out of the Army and was living in his hometown of Decatur, Illinois..we wondered how did Steve make the leap from Decatur to Detroit?

It was in the wintertime 'cause it was horrible, the drive there, so it must have been the end of 1970. I was out somewhere with the Light Brigade (band in Decatur, Illinois) and I think I was in a hotel and the phone rang and it was John Sauter. Apparently, he had called Tootie (Steve’s sister) and then Tootie gave him the hotel where I was staying and I said Hey John, Polar Bear (nickname) how you doin? Then he said well listen, I’m playing with Mitch Ryder up in Detroit and I said wow, that’s great.

And he said well you outta come up here, they’re auditioning for guitar players and they haven’t found anybody, I said really? And he said yeah you should come up here quick, I don’t remember when I went up there, but I went up there as soon as I could so I don’t know if I had to get back to Decatur. But I know I left as soon as I could, probably within a day of the phone call. It was an eight hour drive, all I had in the car was the guitar.

What guitar did you bring?

An SG, I had an old SG a 64 or 60 something or other. And I drove all the way up there and I found the place on Cass Avenue, and it was a condemned building. And I don’t remember whether I rang the doorbell, and it was upstairs, so I went upstairs and it looked like it used to be a newspaper building or something cos it had a great big boardroom which is where they rehearsed, huge!


I don’t even know how it all came about, I guess they were expecting me, there were no cell phones so I couldn’t call ahead and say I was on my way, I just told Johnny when I’d get there. And I don’t think I auditioned the day I got there. Somebody called Mitch and Johnny B and said I was in town and I think we set up something for the next day.

And that’s when I walked in the room and saw a Marshall half stack and the only place I had ever seen one was with Jimi Hendrix and Cream. And right then I thought, you know I don’t give a shit whether I get this audition or not, I didn’t even know what an audition was, I had never done one before. I didn’t know what I was supposed to do or anything. I just didn’t care, I thought, I’m going to be able to play through a Marshall so lets see what that sounds like. And as soon as I plugged it in and turned it on, whatever the settings were that were on it, it sounded F**** great!


Right out of the shoot, and I think it was Mitch, or somebody said “Do you know any Cream tunes” so I said, yeah, I know Crossroads, so we jammed on Crossroads, and then I think we did some Hendrix, and Bob was there (Bob Ezrin?) Yeah Bob was there, Bob came in a little bit later that afternoon, after everybody else and he heard it, (and that was the first time you had met him?) Yeah, I didn’t know who he was, I didn’t know they had an album deal, I didn’t know he was a producer and he was going to produce it, I didn’t know any of that.

I thought he was just some other part of the organization, and um…. they liked it.

And they said well can you move up here? And I say well yeah whatever. I’ll need to go home and get some stuff, yeah sure (they said) can you be back here (I think ) it was by the weekend I don’t remember what day it was, just sometime before the weekend, so we can start rehearsing. Sure, so I drove all the way back to Decatur, threw in some clothes and shit I didn’t bring anything else up with me really, drove all the way back to Detroit and they gave me a room in this condemned building. (So was the half stack theirs or had they hired it?) No, that was theirs; that was back in the days when you could buy a Marshall half stack for $250, it was cheap then. So they owned like a couple.



The first gig I did with them, somebody else had the half stack I didn’t get to use it, I used a Twin, and the Twin had two giant SRO 12’s in it (Speakers) it sounded great but it wasn’t loud enough, they sounded F**** great though. I was standing in front of it thinking man, this sounds better than the Marshall does but it wasn’t nearly loud enough. So they went out and bought me another Marshall. I just used it, it wasn’t mine but that’s it really, the rest of it’s a blur.

I just remember I tried to quit smoking, and that was a terribly wrong place to try to quit smoking, and the day I’d gone the longest without smoking, this arrangement for Rock and Roll (Lou Reed song) came to me like a shot, the whole thing. (Wow! it was like your head cleared) I guess so, it must have cleared up for a second, and the whole Rock and Roll thing came out. So, we went up to rehearsal next day, and I told the guys, I said, you know I kind got an idea for this Rock and Roll cos they wanted to do the tune.


They had played the tune for me, on a cassette or on a record, I think it was probably on a record cos we didn’t have cassettes yet. And I thought, well I don’t know, it sounds kind of folky, the way Lou Did it, it was kinda folky, and they wanted to rock it up. And I just remember the first thing that entered my mind was I wonder how Mountain would do this tune if they were doing it, and the whole arrangement came after that.

So I went up and showed it to them, and they F**** loved it, I could tell, but Detroit people never say anything like “oh that’s great man!” which is one of the reasons I like them, they don’t hype you like LA, over the top. In Detroit they say, yeah this is cool.

I could tell when Mitch was singing it that he loved it just the way he’d sing it, he just punched it out and it sounded great! Then Bob heard it, he said, “what the F*** is that!” and I said well, you know, it’s my arrangement of Rock and Roll; he loved it.

It must have been pretty tough going from Decatur to Detroit?

You know, I was so young and naïve it made no difference to me, I just thought, Oh cool I’m going to playing with Mitch Ryder. I was 21 maybe 22, I didn’t give a shit about any of that stuff.

(Note: Steve’s arrangement of Lou Reed’s ‘Rock and Roll’ was to later catch Lou’s attention and along with Bob Ezrin, that is how Steve came to do his second ever album; Lou Reed’s ‘Berlin’)




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12.18.2013

STEVE HUNTER'S NEW STRING CHANGE BUDDY!


Steve and Karen Hunter have come up with an invaluable gadget for helping change strings on a Bigsby fitted guitar. 


World-renowned guitarist Steve Hunter, known for his work with Lou Reed and Alice Cooper, was trying to change some strings on one of his Gretsch Guitars. As always there was a good deal of frustration as this is difficult for most people, but even more so for someone like Steve who is partially sighted. Only certain guitars have a Bigsby, most of those are Gretsch but there are other makes of guitars such as Gibson and Fender who use the metal string bending arm attachment.


The main problem is how to hold the eyelet at the end of the new string in place, on the pin of the Bigsby, without it springing off when you go to the other end of the neck to wind on the string. Steve said “There must be a way of holding the string in place, maybe something simple that could be taken in and out easily”. Karen thought that a squishy door wedge shape would do the job.

Knowing Steve used foam speaker positioning wedges in his studio she found a spare one. Karen cut out a wedge to the exact requirements and low and behold! The String Change Buddy was born. Steve still uses that very wedge, with less hassle, less time and less swearing!


Perfecting the idea for production took nearly two years, mainly due to finding the right foam. It needed to be firm enough to push under the metal bar of the Bigsby but also needed to have the right compression and recovery so it could be used many times. Once they had started the process of protecting the design with a patent, all they had to do was find the right manufacturer whom they are proud to say is right here in the USA. The String Change Buddy will not change the world but it will help anybody with a Bigsby fitted guitar to change strings without losing their cool.

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