Showing posts with label Punk. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Punk. Show all posts

11.10.2014

WE ARE THE LEAGUE...UN-CUT!


Notorious UK82 Punk Favorites, Anti-Nowhere League, Revisit Their Classic Debut Album!

We Are The League…Uncut! Contains Their Most Popular Anthems Including “I Hate People,” “For You” & Metallica’s Favorite “So What” As Well As Bonus Cuts!

Los Angeles, CA - Anti-Nowhere League will cap off a triumphant 2014 of touring with the release of an LP containing newly recorded versions of their debut album We Are The League. Never heard before, the complete We Are The League album using the original lyrics will be released by Cleopatra Records on October 28. This new release recreates exactly how the album was written before being confiscated, and has never been put together in its entirety since 1982 including the infamous “So What”.



Formed in Turnbridge Wells, England in 1980, Anti-Nowhere League roared to underground popularity with the 1981 release of their debut single, a cover of Ralph McTell’s “Streets of London”, (dragged through the gutter in fine style, of course) backed with “So What”, a track deemed so offensive by the Metropolitan Police's Obscene Publication Squad, that the record distributor’s warehouse was raided and all copies were seized. The League managed to recover from the heavy censoring hand of the law and release their debut LP We Are The League, the next year, although minus “So What” as well as the original lyrics of “Animal” and other tracks.

As lead singer Animal states, “This recording is a lyrical journey through the 80’s, re-recorded in the 21st century using the very original lyrics that the law tried to stop. We didn’t participate in being nice….we wanted nothing from greed and gluttony except to point a middle finger or two at how absurd the country had become”.

Now with a tight, road tested, solid lineup, these songs are given a true presentation as they were intended. All other versions have been rehashed! This is ... WE ARE THE LEAGUE UN-CUT!

1. We Are The League
2. Can’t Stand Rock N’ Roll
3. Animal
4. I Hate People
5. Nowhere Man
6. Woman
7. Streets Of London
8. Wreck A Nowhere
9. Snowman
10. World War III
11. Let’s Break The Law
12. We Will Not Remember You
13. So What

BONUS TRACKS
14. This Is War
15. For You

11.07.2014

SCORPIONS NEW RELEASE!


Audio Fidelity Records To Release Scorpions "Blackout" On Limited Edition Numbered Hybrid SACD

Camarillo, CA - Rock fans worldwide rejoice! Marshall Blonstein's Audio Fidelity is releasing rock legends Scorpions most successful album "Blackout" on limited edition numbered hybrid SACD! "Blackout", their eighth studio album, is Scorpions at their peak...it is the band's 1982 break-through album that made them global superstars. Every song is a gem and this album contains a splendid balance of pop/rock, power ballads and catchy hard rock. Scorpions dish-out fist-poundin' anthems like the top ten hit "No One Like You" then turn around and offer the soul stirring ballad "When the Smoke is Going Down".

Klaus Meine is a singer who knows how to wring the last ounce of impact from each song.The band sounds great as highlighted by the fast-paced performances of guitarists Rudolf Schenker and Matthias Jabs. Herman Rarebell and Francis Buchholz add a tight and powerful drum and bass bottom."Blackout" is the band's most solid and rockin' album. Dieter Dierks production is immaculate. A self-portrait of artist Gottfried Helnwein is featured on the cover of the album.

" 'Blackout' just flat out kicks butt and is one of the most highly anticipated releases in our history." - Marshall Blonstein, Audio Fidelity President

Tracks
1. Blackout
2. Can't Live Without You
3. No One Like You
4. You Give Me All I Need
5. Now!
6. Dynamite
7. Arizona
8. China White
9. When The Smoke Is Going Down

Production
Dieter Dierks - producer, engineer
Mastered by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio

For more information: http://www.audiofidelity.net/content/scorpions-blackout

10.30.2014

TIGER SEX LIVE NOVEMBER 1 AT PAYCHECKS!


We’d like to invite you for our live Rock’n’Roll performance in Detroit.
Saturday Nov 1st at Paychecks Lounge - 2932 Caniff Ave (Hamtramck) 10PM
We are originally from Vegas and making our way across the country!
Detroit it a big influence on us when it comes to sound-Stooges, MC5, Motown etc.


What was once Rock’n’Roll has swallowed us whole and spit us out creating TIGER SEX.

A dangerous animal that’s ready to get EXTRA WILD! Vital, Loud, and Sexy with a twisted mind…we will eat you alive!!

6.19.2014

TEN FOOT POLE BACK WITH TOUR DATES AND NEW ALBUM !


"I never doubted that I'd get back into it at some point – I just needed a break," explains TEN FOOT POLE frontman and founding member Dennis Jagard. "Once you've experienced a crowd singing along to the songs you wrote, it's hard to imagine just walking away from the chance to do it again."

Influential SoCal punk rock staple Ten Foot Pole will be releasing their first album in ten years on Cyber Tracks in 2015. But first, they're getting back into the swing of things by doing what they do best – perform. Their US and Canadian mini headline tour kicks off at Reggie's in Chicago, IL on July 15th then circles around the American Midwest and Northeast concluding at The Brighton Bar in Long Branch, NJ (dates below).

"It's too early in the process to limit or define what's going to come out, but I think it's safe to say that fans can expect candid, sincere, honest and outrageous lyrics matched with some aggressive music, a few well-placed stops, and generous helpings of pick slides and feedback," describes Jagard. "I think a good song works regardless of genre, so I just try to write whatever comes to mind." Jagard has teamed up with drummer Chris Dalley (Pulley, Implants), bassist Chris Del Rio (Implants), and guitarist Keith "DJ" Divel (Swindle, Red Devil Squadron) to help create their newest collection of punk rock sing-alongs.

Ten Foot Pole was founded in 1983 and got their start under the moniker Scared Straight releasing an album and a 7-inch. Ten Foot Pole self-released their debut album Swill in 1993, which would eventually lead to a record deal with Epitaph Records.

Their discography includes six albums (Swill, Rev, Unleashed, Insider – Epitaph Records, Bad Mother Trucker – Victory Records, Subliminable Messages – Go-Kart Records), a split EP with Satanic Surfers, and numerous appearances on compilations. Past members include vocalist and Major League Baseball pitching ace Scott Radinsky and drummers Jordan Burns (Strung Out, Pulley) and Tony Palermo (Papa Roach, Pulley, Unwritten Law). Their seventh studio album will be released in 2015 via Los Angeles-based Cyber Tracks, which is owned and operated by El Hefe of NOFX and his wife Jen. Catch them on tour this summer!

TOUR DATES

July 15 Reggie's – Chicago, IL
July 16 Agora Theatre – Cleveland, OH
July 17 Hard Luck Bar – Toronto, ON
July 18 Belle Pub – Belleville, ON
July 19 Rockaganza! Festival – Drummondville, QC
July 20 The Dover Brickhouse – Dover, NH
July 22 Bogies – Albany, NY
July 23 The Legendary Dobbs – Philadelphia, PA
July 24 The Middle East – Cambridge, MA
July 25 The Grand Victory – Brooklyn, NY
July 26 The Brighton Bar – Long Branch, NJ

6.03.2014

IGGY POP: GIMME SOME SKIN BOX SET


Los Angeles, CA - Iggy Pop fans rejoice! Cleopatra Records will be releasing a special limited edition 7-inch singles box set from the undisputed king of modern punk rock, Iggy Pop! The release includes 7 individual 45s featuring exclusive new tracks as well as classic recordings from 1972-73 with the Stooges - all packaged with a full-color booklet, detailed liner notes, a custom 7-inch vinyl adaptor, and collectible patch!


Track List:
(1) I Can’t Explain / Lonely Boy
(2) Cock In My Pocket / Tight Pants
(3) I Got A Right / White Christmas (Guitar Stooge Mix)
(4) Money (That’s What I Want) / Open Up And Bleed (Single Edit)
(5) I Wanna Be Your Dog (Fast Version) / Johanna
(6) Gimme Some Skin / I’m So Glad
(7) Louie Louie / Scene Of The Crime

Seven singles, fourteen sides. The Stooges in their prime, Iggy in his pomp. And all sufficiently sharp and shapely that, even if you’ve never heard the performers in your life, you’ll know that it couldn’t be anybody else.


THE BOYS: BACK WITH A BANG


The Boys – Back with a Bang

On June 20 2014 THE BOYS release their long-requested first new studio album since 1981 on Wolverine Records. Featuring the original founder members and creative core of Matt Dangerfield, Casino Steel and Honest John Plain, the new album “Punk Rock Menopause” is packed with 13 iconic new songs bearing the band’s classic trademark blistering guitars, hard-edged melodies, killer hooks and layered harmonies. It will be released as CD/LP and Digital Download!


The Boys Story

Along with the Sex Pistols, Clash and The Damned, The Boys were part of the first wave of the mid-1970’s UK punk explosion. Armed with an arsenal of killer Steel/Dangerfield songs The Boys became the first UK punk band to sign an album deal in January 1977. Highly regarded by the music press and their contemporaries, their well-crafted songs, together with Steel and Dangerfield’s love of harmonies, led to them being described as ‘The Beatles of Punk’ but they could (and should) just as deservedly have been compared to the Ramones – fast, alternately brattish and tongue-in-cheek, and gloriously anthemic.

As Last FM puts it: “The Boys made arguably one of the best LPs of the 70s with their self-titled first album and provided the template for superior Pop Punk before even the Buzzcocks had got out of first gear”.

The Boys were born in September 1975 when singer/guitarist Matt Dangerfield left Mick Jones and Tony James’s fledgling punk band London SS to form a new band with ex-Hollywood Brats songwriter/keyboard player Casino Steel. Dangerfield’s art college pal, guitarist Honest John Plain, was quickly recruited. The following year they held auditions for the bass and drum roles with Kid Reid and Jack Black completing the line-up.

Matt Dangerfield had converted the tiny disused coal cellar of his rented basement flat in Maida Vale into a home recording studio/rehearsal room and as a consequence, 47A Warrington Crescent became extremely important in the development of the UK punk scene in the mid seventies. Mick Jones, Glen Matlock, Tony James, Rat Scabies, Brian James, Gene October, Sid Vicious and Billy Idol were regular visitors. Amongst others, The Sex Pistols, The Damned, London SS, Clash, Chelsea, Generation X and of course, The Boys, made their first recordings there. In this hotbed of creativity Steel and Dangerfield quickly forged a prolific songwriting partnership.

The Boys made their live debut at London’s Hope and Anchor in September 1976. Mick Jones, Billy Idol, Joe Strummer, Tony James and Gene October were in attendance for The Boys first performance. A mere handful of gigs later, they became the first UK punk band to sign an album deal when NEMS Records snapped them up in January 1977.

Having released two albums and three singles with NEMS, they moved to Safari Records in 1979 where two further albums and five more singles followed.

Over the years countless bands have covered The Boys’ back catalogue – from Argentina to Germany and Japan to the USA – and even more artists have cited The Boys as a major influence. According to the privileged few to have heard it in advance, the new album is right up there with its predecessors and destined to add a handful of new ‘Boys Classics’ to the band’s legacy.

3.19.2014

BEHIND THE SCENES IN DETROIT ROCK: LATE 1970S


Sillies singer BEN WAUGH flies above the stage at Bookie's while Bob "Bootsey X" Mulrooney keeps a beat. PHOTO: Robert Matheu, Creem Magazine

One of the few outlets for original rock music in Detroit in the 70's were small theaters and auditoriums. The thriving ballroom scene and teen clubs of the late 60's and early 70's disappeared.

 The Hideout was a Harper Woods VFW Hall

The Hideout was a Harper Woods rental hall named Harper Hall which was leased weekends by Dave Leone and his partner "Punch" Andrews in the mid-60's and brought Bob Seger, Ted Nugent (Amboy Dukes), Grosse Pointe favorites The Underdogs, and many others their first taste of fame.

 Cinderella Theater on Jefferson

Concerts at the Cinderella Theater on Jefferson (where J. Geils recorded a live album) and the Eastown Theater in the early 70's just ceased to exist. After two concerts in 1977 at The Kramer Theater on Michigan near Livernois, a concert at the Trenton Theater downriver, and an abortive attempt to lease The Ramona Theater, I was looking for some way to play without losing any more hard-earned money I'd made on the Chrysler assembly line.


 In January '78, a boarded-up gay bar at John R and Seven Mile was made available to us as long as the owner got ALL the door receipts (or so I was told). A couple of those shows in January and February were packed houses, but I wasn't interested in continuing to make money for everyone else.


Sam "Bookie" Stewart offered us a weekend in March at his club and we agreed as a band to do it. The original bill was The Sillies, Coldcock, and Curly's Convicts, a Windsor band. The Denizens (from Livonia) ended up as the opener, which was fortuitous as they became a mainstay at Bookie's for the next two years as did Coldcock.
 

Much to my surprise, Don Fagenson (a.k.a. Don Was) brought the new MC-5 into Bookie's three weeks before our date in spite of the fact that the room hadn't had live music since band leader Frank Gagen ran the place back in the 40's or 50's.

The following week was Fagenson's "Motor City Revue" with The Traitors (Fagenson's "punk" band", The Niggers (a black concept band he had assembled), and The Pigs. Word was the turnout for both shows was less than hoped.

The following week, Sureshot Productions hastily assembled a few bands to fill in the night. The Sillies were asked to play, but we deemed it safer to wait until out own headline, which had been booked six weeks before.

The crowd for both March 17 and 18 were such that Bookie offered us the room to book from there on in. Ironically, I didn't WANT it! Bookie kept half the $3 a head admission price. Other bars would give you the ENTIRE door PLUS 10% of the bar receipts. My rhythm guitarist begged me to partner with him on the room and, being my best friend, I reluctantly agreed. I had no idea that it would change the live rock scene in Detroit for the next 35 years.

2.22.2014

IN AN IGGY POP GALAXY 1982


In an Iggy Pop galaxy far, far away comes this 1982 interview by Pamela Peer

Iggy Pop, also known as, James Newell Osterberg of Ann Arbor, Michigan was in a reflective mood on that drizzling San Francisco afternoon. He was recuperating from a sprained ankle suffered at an Edmonton, Alberta gig on the “Zombie Bird House” tour, which gave him pause to evaluate his circumstances.

“It’s the funniest thing, because it’s made me think about what’s important to me. It’s only a bad sprain. I’ve had much more basic things happen to me, but they didn’t faze me. But not to have your two feet on the ground, it’s like where’s my swagger?”

Before recording Zombie Bird House on Chris Stein’s (Blondie) Animal Records, Iggy had been soul searching. Touring to support Party, his last Arista Record, The Rolling Stones put Pop on a couple of their dates. Although he enjoyed it, when he got off the tour in December 1981, he “had this nagging dissatisfaction with where things were at for me. I was starting to feel too much like I had a career with a small ‘c’.”

That was when Stein approached Pop about recording an album on his Animal label. Stein outlined the structure of his small corporation and Iggy knew that the budget for the project Stein was proposing would be low.


At that time, Iggy had been living for two years at an “outrageously” priced Manhattan hotel and describes his life as” living it up daily”. Iggy needed time to consider the offer, so he popped down to the Carolinas to see family and golf with his parents during January. He concluded that if moved forward with Stein, living large at a Manhattan hotel and dining at NYC’s finest eateries would no longer be an option.

“I wondered if I had it in me to do something else,” Iggy recalls. Pop put himself to the test and sought shelter in Brooklyn. Actually, he asked his light man, Sal Lupo to find him an apartment because by his own admission, Iggy is “really lousy at apartment hunting”. To him, “Brooklyn was a vague image. I mean it might as well be Berlin.” After a thoughtful pause, Iggy continued, “My Brooklyn image was where a lot of writers came from and that sort of what I’ve been dying to do for a long time…to be an author. I’ve always wanted to articulate more fully in my work.”


And he did just that with the publication of “I Want More: The Stooges and Other Stories”. What started out as a photojournalistic Stooges chronicle, Iggy had an angle, and “I just wanted to spit that part of my life out.”

The book and new album reflects Iggy Pop’s new life experiences of living in an apartment, taking out his own garbage and learning to type. He says he uses the town well by eating its fresh food, writing all morning on his second-hand Smith Corona and commuting daily to the city. Pop feels he is living “efficiently and making every dollar count”.

When formulating the creative blueprint for Zombie Bird House, nothing was left to chance. Two months were spent in pre-production work. Iggy and long-time musical mate, Rob duPrey became equal collaborators noting, “There’s only so many times when it’s appropriate to have a hired hand. It’s nice to have somebody with equity.”


The two pooled their instruments and musical resources and had the sound on each song almost complete before going into the studio – “right down to which drumbeat goes where. “The words were the hardest thing. But what I was shooting for basically was alternative news. I was getting a real bad aftertaste from television. Real People (an NBC reality television series that aired from 1979 to 1984) isn’t a bad idea, but it isn’t real enough for me,” says the former Stooge. “I don’t mind the news, but I don’t love it either. So I wanted to talk less about myself and more about what’s around me.”

The vocals on Zombie are not as fluid in range as on his previous albums. Pop attributes this to his concern for diction in conveying the alternative news’ message and the lack of intoxication. Iggy says he was straighter during these sessions than on other albums. A little juice to grease the pipes on the next album probably wouldn’t hurt.

Considering Iggy’s new fascination with writing, it seemed obvious to ask if music was still a priority. He responds, “I enjoy live work, but I don’t think the traveling constantly is all that good for you. It’s like eating too much ice cream. I could never stop doing music. I really want to do Off-Broadway. I’d like to stay in a town and perform every night, with the ability to make it finely honed. I couldn’t imagine not singing or playing…I’m a rocker!”

Iggy Pop & Glen Matlock live in 1982, photo by Roberta Bayley.

Even among the most rebellious rockers, Iggy Pop has the reputation of being outrageous. But at 35, it seems the man is mellowing. Being sidelined in a hotel with a healing ankle, Pop notes “these past couple of days have been one of those times when in the past, I would have blown up.” But he isn’t exploding, he’s examining…himself.

Detroit audiences have always joined in the madness at an Iggy gig – after all, Detroit is his home turf. And he says, “when Iggy comes to town, get the bottles, the eggs, the pineapples…even guns have been displayed. I was shit scared this time ‘cause it wasn’t only Detroit, it was Halloween in Detroit.”

He did the Detroit and an Ann Arbor gig and a book signing – all interactive activities and Iggy was pleased. “I got respect. Nobody threw anything. I felt great about that.”

To what does he attribute his newfound respect?

“My attitude,” says Iggy. “I rocked my butt off on stage and tried to remember to say ‘thank you’ once in a while.”

1.20.2014

BOOKIE'S CLUB 870: DETROIT PUNK


SCOTT CAMPBELL:

Back in the mid-70's, Detroit was a vast arid wasteland for bands playing their own music. The coffeehouse and ballroom scene of the mid-60's had disappeared. No band got a bar gig without five sets of Top 40 mainstream radio covers. Bar owners would actually give song lists to bands with the condition that they had to play those songs if they were going to play at all. Stages were short and tiny or nonexistent and no bar had it's own PA.


Then, disco reared its ugly head. It was cheaper to hire a deejay than a band and bar goers seemed to like it. Original rock bands had nowhere to play unless they were huge national acts. Even mid level bands from outside Detroit had nowhere to play if they couldn't pull in 4,000 people. One band that was willing to do something about it was The Sillies.


They formed in 1977 and did their first show second-billed to Rob Tyner's new version of The MC5, renting a theater for the show. The crowd topped 1,000 but the band lost money due to a curious lack of money at the door. Something smaller and on a weekly basis was needed to kick start the local music scene again. By early 1978, The Sillies did a few shows in closed bars that were open one night for the event. They soon got an invitation to play Frank Gagen's, an old supper club on West McNichols (Six Mile) that was operating as a gay disco.


The bar down the street (Menjo's) had taken most of their business and the owner Sam Stewart was willing to try anything. Though the sign said "Gagen's", the place was known as "Bookie's Club 870" after Stewart's nickname and the address, 870 W. McNichols. Two weeks before the scheduled show, Don Fagenson, better known now as producer "Don Was", came in with his Motor City Revue and his attempt at a punk band, The Traitors. The Sillies bided their time and did their scheduled shows on March 17 and 18. By the end of the second night, Bookie handed the bar over to The Sillies to book as they chose.


After that, every weekend was a concert with three bands doing a set of their own music instead of one band doing five sets of radio hits. Detroit acts like Wayne Kramer, The Romantics, Destroy All Monsters (with Stooges guitarist Ron Asheton, Niagara, Rob King and MC5 bassist Mike Davis) would headline some weekends while bands such as The Police, The Damned, Ultravox, The Cramps, The Dead Boys, and many others made Bookie's their one and only Michigan tour date.


Bowie parked outside the front door in his limousine the night he played Detroit in 1978, but only his band actually came inside to hear "punk rock disco" for an admission price of 50 cents (it was a weekday with no live band).

The music before and between the live sets was the only place people could hear the latest punk and New Wave records in Detroit as no radio station would play them. Sillies vocalist Ben Waugh would bring his own records from home or borrow others from friends and bar regulars, then stop the music and run to the mixing board to run sound for the live band.
 

Radio deejays like Sky Daniels of W4 would occasionally come to the club and hear "Roxanne" by The Police before it was ever released in the U.S. Eventually, Bookie's was a victim of it's own success. A concert promotion company took over the club and The Sillies concentrated on touring the U.S. and Canada.


A succession of promoters ran the room for varying periods of time until Bookie sold it to someone who thought it would be a good idea to turn it back into a drag show bar. The building mysteriously burned to the ground in 1991 and was torn down. Now only a parking lot exists where J. Geils played to a packed house after a three day sellout at Pine Knob.


A handful of unreleased recordings, videotapes, and photos are all that is left of that brief moment of creativity and originality. On the other hand, Bookie's inspired the opening of Lili's, Paycheck's, and an endless stream of like-minded clubs that exist to this very day. Bookie's itself disappeared before its ashes were cold, but its legacy as a showcase for Detroit music continues to this very day.


"It wasn't huge, but it had a faded elegance about it that gave it a lot of character. After I left in late 1979, they gutted it to shoehorn as many people as possible. It was awful. It was like they stuffed and mounted Syd Barrett and put him on tour. I saw what they did to it and it almost made me cry."


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